Classes

Classes

Jiu-jitsu:

Although its origins can arguably be traced to Buddhist monks of India, Jiu Jitsu (sometimes referred to as "Ju Jitsu") in its modern form comes from Japan. Jiu Jitsu was the battlefield art of the Samurai of Japan. These Samurai warriors were well-armored and usually on horseback and the art of Jiu Jitsu was essentially developed to allow the Samurai to fight effectively in the event that they found themselves disarmed and on foot. Due to the restricted mobility and agility associated with fighting in armor, Jiu Jitsu evolved to include throws, joint-locks and strangles, as well as striking moves found in other martial arts.

Jiu-jitsu eventually found it’s way to Brazil in 1914 by the way of Mitsuo Maeda, who taught the art to the Gracie family, most notably Helio Gracie. Helio was the smallest and most frail of his brothers, and thus had to adapt the art to suit a smaller opponent. Helio created what we now call “Gracie Jiu-jitsu,” or Brazilian Jiu-jitsu. 

Jiu-jitsu then made its way to the United States by the way of Helio’s oldest son Rorion Gracie, who help found the Ultimate Fighting Championship (UFC). Roion’s brother Royce would go on to win the first 3 UFC contests, showing the effectiveness of Jiu-jitsu against other arts, and against much larger opponents.

Here at the Wolves’ Den we offer an abundance of Jiu-jitsu classes. Of all the arts we have the most class tine slots devoted to Jiu-jitsu.

Head Jiu-jitsu instructor Andrew “Mop-Jitsu” Ebers has been training in the art of Jiu-jitsu for over 15+ years, and has earned the rank of Black Belt under his instructors: JW Wright and Keith Robinson. 

Professor Ebers’ lineage: JW Wright/Keith Robinson – Royler Gracie- Heilio Gracie – Mitsuo Maeda

Muay Thai:

Muay Thai, translated into English as Thai Boxing, is the national sport of Thailand and is a martial art with origins in the ancient battlefield tactics of the Siamese (or Thai) army.  During the latter half of the 20th century Muay Thai was exported to many countries and is now practiced by hundreds of thousands of people all over the world. Modern Muay Thai fights feature punches, kicks, elbows, knees, and sweeps. Muay Thai has also proven very effective outside the ring and has been embraced enthusiastically by practitioners of a variety of self-defense, sporting, military and law enforcement activities.Head Muay Thai instructor JP Madus has been training Muay Thai for 10+ years. His students have competed in TBA, Wako, Invicta, Bellator, and the UFC.

Wrestling:

Wrestling is one of the oldest forms of combat, referenced in the Iliad and depicted in 15,000-year-old cave drawings in France. Early Egyptian and Babylonian reliefs show moves still used today.

Always popular in ancient Greece, wrestling held a prominent place in the Olympic Games. It was developed by ancient Greeks as a way to train soldiers in hand-to-hand combat. After defeating the Greeks, the Roman Empire borrowed from Greek wrestling but eliminated much of the brutality. The Greeks feared the true history of the sport would be lost, and so Greco-Roman wrestling was born.

Today wrestling is one of the most popular sports on earth, and is even taught in highschools and colleges throughout the country.

Head Wrestling Coach, Cornell Robinson (Coach Rob) has trained some of the best cadet wrestlers in the country. As head coach of Christian Brothers College, he has also secured several state championships. Coach Rob is passionate about transferring his wrestling credentials over to the MMA and submission grappling world.

Boxing:

Boxing is a sport of fighting with fists, also called pugilism (literally fist fight). Boxing has been included in the Olympic Games program since 1904. For centuries people used their fists to resolve disputes before someone thought of organizing such fights as entertainment. Western boxing utilizes punches, head movement, and footwork. Modern Boxing is one of the most popular sports on the planet. 

Boxing instructors Bryant Hurt, Brandon Beatty, and Liz Helton have created a program that is heavily based in competition and has been very successful in the local St. Louis boxing circuit.

MMA:

Mixed martial arts is a combination of multiple disciplines into one, no holds barred, martial art. MMA utilizes Punches, kicks, elbows, knees, takedowns, and submissions. At the Wolves’ Den our MMA program has sent athletes to the UFC, Bellator, Invicta, LFA, and multiple other organizations across the globe. Our MMA program is a select, invite only, competition team. It could take months to years to make it on to the team, but you can do it!

Jiu-jitsu:

Although its origins can arguably be traced to Buddhist monks of India, Jiu Jitsu (sometimes referred to as "Ju Jitsu") in its modern form comes from Japan. Jiu Jitsu was the battlefield art of the Samurai of Japan. These Samurai warriors were well-armored and usually on horseback and the art of Jiu Jitsu was essentially developed to allow the Samurai to fight effectively in the event that they found themselves disarmed and on foot. Due to the restricted mobility and agility associated with fighting in armor, Jiu Jitsu evolved to include throws, joint-locks and strangles, as well as striking moves found in other martial arts.

Jiu-jitsu eventually found it’s way to Brazil in 1914 by the way of Mitsuo Maeda, who taught the art to the Gracie family, most notably Helio Gracie. Helio was the smallest and most frail of his brothers, and thus had to adapt the art to suit a smaller opponent. Helio created what we now call “Gracie Jiu-jitsu,” or Brazilian Jiu-jitsu. 

Jiu-jitsu then made its way to the United States by the way of Helio’s oldest son Rorion Gracie, who help found the Ultimate Fighting Championship (UFC). Roion’s brother Royce would go on to win the first 3 UFC contests, showing the effectiveness of Jiu-jitsu against other arts, and against much larger opponents.

Here at the Wolves’ Den we offer an abundance of Jiu-jitsu classes. Of all the arts we have the most class tine slots devoted to Jiu-jitsu.

Head Jiu-jitsu instructor Andrew “Mop-Jitsu” Ebers has been training in the art of Jiu-jitsu for over 15+ years, and has earned the rank of Black Belt under his instructors: JW Wright and Keith Robinson. 

Professor Ebers’ lineage: JW Wright/Keith Robinson – Royler Gracie- Heilio Gracie – Mitsuo Maeda

Muay Thai:

Muay Thai, translated into English as Thai Boxing, is the national sport of Thailand and is a martial art with origins in the ancient battlefield tactics of the Siamese (or Thai) army.  During the latter half of the 20th century Muay Thai was exported to many countries and is now practiced by hundreds of thousands of people all over the world. Modern Muay Thai fights feature punches, kicks, elbows, knees, and sweeps. Muay Thai has also proven very effective outside the ring and has been embraced enthusiastically by practitioners of a variety of self-defense, sporting, military and law enforcement activities.Head Muay Thai instructor JP Madus has been training Muay Thai for 10+ years. His students have competed in TBA, Wako, Invicta, Bellator, and the UFC.

Wrestling:

Wrestling is one of the oldest forms of combat, referenced in the Iliad and depicted in 15,000-year-old cave drawings in France. Early Egyptian and Babylonian reliefs show moves still used today.

Always popular in ancient Greece, wrestling held a prominent place in the Olympic Games. It was developed by ancient Greeks as a way to train soldiers in hand-to-hand combat. After defeating the Greeks, the Roman Empire borrowed from Greek wrestling but eliminated much of the brutality. The Greeks feared the true history of the sport would be lost, and so Greco-Roman wrestling was born.

Today wrestling is one of the most popular sports on earth, and is even taught in highschools and colleges throughout the country.

Head Wrestling Coach, Cornell Robinson (Coach Rob) has trained some of the best cadet wrestlers in the country. As head coach of Christian Brothers College, he has also secured several state championships. Coach Rob is passionate about transferring his wrestling credentials over to the MMA and submission grappling world.

Boxing:

Boxing is a sport of fighting with fists, also called pugilism (literally fist fight). Boxing has been included in the Olympic Games program since 1904. For centuries people used their fists to resolve disputes before someone thought of organizing such fights as entertainment. Western boxing utilizes punches, head movement, and footwork. Modern Boxing is one of the most popular sports on the planet. 

Boxing instructors Bryant Hurt, Brandon Beatty, and Liz Helton have created a program that is heavily based in competition and has been very successful in the local St. Louis boxing circuit.

MMA:

Mixed martial arts is a combination of multiple disciplines into one, no holds barred, martial art. MMA utilizes Punches, kicks, elbows, knees, takedowns, and submissions. At the Wolves’ Den our MMA program has sent athletes to the UFC, Bellator, Invicta, LFA, and multiple other organizations across the globe. Our MMA program is a select, invite only, competition team. It could take months to years to make it on to the team, but you can do it!